Teeth Whitener

Teeth Whitener Related Terms:
Britesmile, Cosmetic Treatments, Dental Care, Dental Whitening, Dentisit, Face Procedure, Home Teeth Whitening, Laser Teeth Whitening, Plastic Surgery, Smile Makeover, Stains, Teeth, Teeth Bleaching, Teeth Whitening Methods, Teeth Whitening, Whiten Teeth, Whitening, Yellow Teeth



What Are Teeth Whiteners?

A teeth whitener is among the most popular cosmetic treatments available in current times. Teeth whitening can be carried out in multiple ways and you can get it done either in the office of a dentist or at home using a professionally dispensed custom teeth whitening kit or an over the counter teeth whitener. It is a perfect yet simple and affordable face procedure for those who want to improve their smiles.

Who Should Do It?

Anybody who wants to improve the quality of their smile by getting rid of teeth stains, discolorations and yellow teeth can opt for teeth whitening. However, it is not advised for children below 16 years of age and for those who already have very sensitive teeth or gum problems. It is best to consult a dentist before you try out any kind of teeth whitener.


teeth whitener - The Procedure

Teeth whiteners are available in various forms in the market today. They can be bought in the form of gels, whitening pens, creams, strips, trays and toothpastes. In office application of a teeth whitener generally takes an hour, and most dentists nowadays use a combination of bleach based product application with some kind of light treatment. In office teeth whitening takes approximately an hour per sitting, and the results of one session can last till years if maintained properly.

teeth whitener - Risks and Side Effects

Using a teeth whitener may cause heightened teeth sensitivity in some individuals. Many people may also undergo transient burning sensation in the gums. Those having fillings and restorations may end up with technicolor or unevenly colored teeth if teeth whitening is not carried out by an experienced dental care specialist.

teeth whitener - News update:
The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has published an appraisal consultation document (ACD – draft guidance) on the use of alendronate, etidronate, risedronate, raloxifene, strontium ranelate and teriparatide for the secondary prevention of osteoporotic fragility fractures in postmenopausal women. The guidance recommends (direct from source): 1.1 Alendronate is recommended as a treatment option for the secondary prevention of osteoporotic fragility fractures in postmenopausal women who have a T-score of -2.5 SD or below. In women aged 75 years or older, a DXA scan may not be required if the responsible clinician considers it to be clinically inappropriate or unfeasible. When the decision has been made to initiate treatment with alendronate, the preparation prescribed should be chosen on the basis of the lowest acquisition cost available. 1.2 Risedronate and etidronate are recommended as alternative treatment options for the secondary prevention of osteoporotic fragility fractures in postmenopausal women: • who are unable to comply with the special instructions for the administration of alendronate, have a contraindication to, or are intolerant of alendronate (as defined in section 1.7) and • who also have a T-score, age and number of independent clinical risk factors for fracture (see section 1.5) - please refer to table in the ACD for T-scores (SD) at (or below) which risedronate or etidronate is recommended. 1.3 Raloxifene and strontium ranelate are recommended as alternative treatment options for the secondary prevention of osteoporotic fragility fractures in postmenopausal women: • who are unable to comply with the special instructions for the administration of alendronate and risedronate, or who have a contraindication to or are intolerant of alendronate and risedronate (as defined in section 1.6) and • who also have a T-score, age and number of independent clinical risk factors for fracture (see section 1.5) - please refer to table in the ACD for T-scores (SD) at (or below) which raloxifene or strontium ranelate is recommended. 1.4 Teriparatide is recommended as an alternative treatment option for the secondary prevention of osteoporotic fragility fractures in postmenopausal women: • who are unable to take alendronate and risedronate, have a contraindication to, or are intolerant of alendronate and risedronate (as defined in section 1.6) or who have a contraindication to, or are intolerant of strontium ranelate (as defined in section 1.7) and • who are 65 years or older and have an extremely low BMD (with a T-score of -4 SD or below), or a very low BMD (with a T-score of -3.5 SD or below) plus multiple fractures (that is, more than two), or who are aged 55-64 years and have a T-score of -4 SD or below plus multiple fractures (that is, more than two). 1.5 For the purposes of this guidance, independent clinical risk factors for fracture to be considered are: parental history of hip fracture, alcohol intake of 4 or more units per day, and severe, long-term rheumatoid arthritis. 1.6 For the purposes of this guidance, intolerance of alendronate and risedronate is defined as persistent upper gastrointestinal disturbance that is sufficiently severe to warrant discontinuation of treatment and that occurs even though the instructions for administration have been followed correctly. 1.7 For the purpose of this guidance, intolerance of strontium ranelate is defined as persistent nausea or diarrhoea, either of which warrants discontinuation of treatment. 1.8 Women who are currently receiving treatment with one of the drugs covered by this guidance, but for whom therapy would have not been recommended according to sections 1.1 to 1.4, should have the option to continue therapy until they and their clinicians consider it appropriate to stop. The key dates for this appraisal are: Closing date for comments: 23 April 2008 Second Appraisal Committee meeting: 01 May 2008 More...

teeth whitener - Benefits

People with stained, brown or yellow teeth can end up with brighter smiles and teeth that are at least 5 to 9 shades lighter than what they started with.

Teeth Whitener - Costs

Over the counter teeth whiteners are available for as less as $10 to $60 while an in office teeth whitening can cost anywhere from $300 to $1000 .

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